Best Practices on Halloween Must Include the Notorious RBG

By Jessica N. Haller, Blog Assistant of “Best Practices for Legal Education” Blog

Last week, Albany Law Students gave back to our host community, enjoyed the mental health break of seeing children in costumes enjoy Halloween, and collaborated with each other in meaningful ways.

Every year, Albany Law School opens wide its doors and creates a safe place for local children to trick or treat on Halloween right in the school’s gymnasium. There are families who now come year after year and who now see the law school as a place their children might one day attend. Most of the student organizations participate, setting up tables, handing out candy to the children or face painting. Many groups often have an activity or game or other treat for the costumed kids. For example, the Student Bar Association had a “Connect Four” game and the Black Law Student Association made “worms in dirt” dessert (chocolate ice cream, Oreos, and gummy worms, yum!).

I am currently on the e-board for the Albany Law School Women’s Law Caucus and this year, we decided to combine fun with a chance to teach children about our favorite U.S. Supreme Court Justice: Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG). We created a game called, “Pin the Dissent Collar on RBG.” We knew that many of the children coming to this event might not know who RBG is and we hoepd it might spark some conversation. We printed a large poster of RBG’s iconic Supreme Court photo and purchased three different kinds of black ribbon. The first little girl to participate was very enthusiastic about playing the game and asked about this mysterious “RBG.” You can see her playing the game in the photo below:

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a feminine icon for women, especially for those of us in law school and in the legal academy. Despite the unending obstacles, she persevered. She was turned away from jobs despite being at the top of her class, and when she was able to get a job, she was paid considerably less than her male counterparts. She argued several cases, making it clear in each that gender equality is a constitutional right. For more information on RBG’s life and career, see her bio on Oyez (I also highly recommend a great documentary called “RBG” found here).

(Author and Blog Assistant, Jessica N. Haller, dressed as Agent “Peggy” Carter)

The Heart of a Justice

It’s interesting that, regardless of his conservative bona fides, Justice Scalia’s “best friend” on the court was Justice Ginsburg, one of the more liberal Justices.  The two, and their spouses, apparently socialized regularly.   As a law professor who works with students on a daily basis, I hope this aspect of Justice Scalia can provide a lesson to students and us all. This friendship of opposites demonstrates that a person’s humanity is measured by far more than the sum of one’s political views.

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